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from London Luxury

Cillian Murphy’s roles often include an element of malevolence, the opposite of his actual persona, discovers Luxury London. With Irish charm and genuine modesty, he’s one of Hollywood’s nice guys

Whenever you read about Cork-born actor Cillian Murphy, it’s typically his physical attributes that get talked up the most. Sure, he might have cheekbones that deserve their own postcode and eyes that could convince you to do the most heinous of crimes, but what’s more impressive is his range as an actor; he is the antithesis of typecast.

From a young trans woman in Breakfast on Pluto (for which he won Best Actor at the Irish Film and Television Academy Awards) to the leader of a Birmingham gang in Peaky Blinders, from Batman’s nemesis and crazy psychiatrist in Batman Begins to a post-apocalyptic survivor in 28 Days Later, Murphy’s character profile is chameleon, but all  of his roles have a similar theme. They ’re executed with a intensity that’s helping define a career.

One of his is latest projects, Anthropoid, may sound like a sci-fi film, but it’s actually a taut biopic thriller inspired by the gallant efforts of two freedom fighters and their mission to eliminate notorious top-ranking Nazi, and Hitler’s third in command, Reinhard Heydrich, the architect of the Final Solution during World War II. He undertakes the role of a Czechoslovakian resistance fighter Jozef Gabčík, head of a team of soldiers tasked with the assassination. Starring alongside fellow Irishman Jamie Dornan, known for the racy film adaptation of Fifty Shades of Grey and the BBC series The Fall, both men admit they didn’t know about the story before being approached for the film.

“It’s not widely known outside of the Czech Republic, which is kind of criminal given how it altered the course of World War II and consequently altered the course of history,” says Murphy. “It’s part of their identity in the Czech Republic. It was fascinating to learn about it and these different aspects of the war that affected the outcome.” Murphy describes how it’s a “story of remarkable heroism and human endeavour”.

On working alongside the man of the moment Dornan, Murphy says, “the man is an ogre.” Of course, Murphy is saying this in jest – when describing the pair, the word ‘bromance’ is regularly thrown around.

Read the entire article at the source up above.

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